Rodeo Events


The Butte Vigilante Saddle Club in Butte, Montana holds the following events. Click on an event to learn more about it. If you have questions, contact us or call us directly at 406-494-6700.
Rodeo
Bull-a-Rama
Wild Cow Milking
Ring of Fire
Mutton Bustin’
Lineman’s Rodeo
Before you continue reading about the events held at our arena, we’d like to address one of the biggest questions we hear: “Does rodeo harm the animals involved?” The answer is a resounding NO! Many people falsely believe that rodeo is cruel and inhumane. These people are misinformed. All the animals involved are highly valued to their owners. They are the lifeblood of their business and steps are taken to insure the safety of the animals. In fact, due to the light work of the animals (they only buck for 8 seconds), life expectancy for rodeo stock is longer than most normal livestock, including saddle horses. Rodeo stock also live a much more natural life in order to keep them wild.

Rodeo

A rodeo is a sporting event where contestants show their skills in horseback riding, cattle roping, bull riding, barrel racing, and other ranching activities. Sometimes including pole bending and some other events.
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Bull-a-Rama

Bull riding is the most recognized and popular of all the rodeo events. It is also the most dangerous. An often quoted saying about bull riding is “it’s not if you get hurt, it’s when.” Every bull rider can attest to the truth of that saying.
Why is rodeo riding only 8 seconds?
The 8-second length of a qualified ride was devised to protect the safety and well-being of the animals involved. After 8 seconds the horse or bulls bucking ability decreases because of fatigue, adrenaline loss, etc.
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Wild Cow Milking

Wild cow milking is a competitive event often held as part of a ranch rodeo. The rules can vary from one wild cow-milking event to another depending on the preferences of the hosting rodeo committee, or if the event is sanctioned by a governing body (such as the Working Ranch Cowboys Association. In general, though, wild cow milking is a timed competition that begins when a cow is turned loose into the arena.
A ranch rodeo team (four team members is common) will then try to rope the cow, “mug” her (control her by hand, particularly the head), and milk her until they get small amount of milk in a bottle. The time usually stops after the cow is milked and one member of the team runs with the bottle to a designated area in the arena. For the time to county there has to be a certain amount of milk in the bottle. For example, at many Wild Cow Milking contents there must be enough milk in the bottle that at least one drop runs out when the bottle is turned upside down. Whichever team ropes, mugs, and milks their cow the fastest wins.
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Ring of Fire

The ring of fire is not for everyone. Five spectator volunteers sign up for this fast, furious, and funny event. There are 5 circles drawn in the center of the arena. Each man/woman stands in the center. The bull is then released into the arena and the fun begins. The participants cannot leave the circle in order to win. The bull circles and charges (the bull selected is not really vicious or dangerous). If you watch the clowns they are usually prompting the bull. The last participant standing in their ring is the winner of the money.
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Mutton Bustin’

In this event a sheep is held still, either in a small chute or by an adult handler while a child is placed on top in the riding position. Once the child is seated atop the sheep, the sheep is released and usually starts to run in an attempt to get the child off. Often small prizes or ribbons are given out to the children who stay on the longest. There are no set rules for mutton busting, no national organization, and most events are organized at the local level.
The vast majority of children participating in the event fall off in less than 8 seconds. Age, height, and weight restrictions on participants generally prevent injuries to the sheep, and implements such as spurs are banned from use. In most cases children are required to wear helmets and parents are often asked to sign waivers to protect the rodeo from legal action.
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Lineman’s Rodeo

A competition in Journeyman, Apprentice, and Team Lineman skills but not totally limited to linemen. Tree Trimmers and Equipment Operators, as well as the general public, and children may compete in some of the events. A family oriented gathering to watch linemen, tree trimmers, and equipment operators demonstrate their unique and specialized skills in a competition.
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